Caveman instincts fuel drink choices

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Primitive habits are still present in our approach to food and drink, according to research.


Three broad instincts - to conform, to explore and to seek reward - are at the heart of consumer attitudes to brands according to Intellima’s Global Trends in Alcoholic Drinks report. These instincts are being reinforced by social media, the report says.

 

Using examples from the drinks industry as well as the wider consumer world, the report builds a picture of how people are “converging towards a set of characteristics and behaviour patterns”. Although the study acknowledges that some of the behaviours are more likely to be found in the developed world, it argues that these characteristics, which also include increasing emphasis on health, the internet-fuelled phenomenon of creating, adapting and mixing ideas and the need to ensure that a brand is telling the truth are as applicable in China as they are in the UK.


The report links the resurgence in vinyl record sales to a fondness for old-time drinks branding and it says there is a connection between Starbucks’ UK tax affairs and the natural wine movement. The report also draws parallels with the online reaction to the horsemeat scandal and chat room calls in China for better regulation around food and drink.

 

Intellima chief executive Lulie Halstead said: “The internet has not changed us as human beings. It has simply allowed us to tap into some very ancient instincts and to act upon them in new ways. All of the nine trends we observe around the world have been accelerated or amplified by new technology, so the pace of change in the consumer world is unparalleled.”


Global Trends in Alcoholic Drinks 2013 is published by Intellima, in association with Wine Intelligence priced at £1000.

 

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